10 23

CDL CARPET : CDL


CDL CARPET : RUGS CONTEMPORARY : CARPET CLEANING ARIZONA.



Cdl Carpet





cdl carpet






    carpet
  • rug: floor covering consisting of a piece of thick heavy fabric (usually with nap or pile)

  • form a carpet-like cover (over)

  • cover completely, as if with a carpet; "flowers carpeted the meadows"

  • A thick or soft expanse or layer of something

  • A floor or stair covering made from thick woven fabric, typically shaped to fit a particular room

  • A large rug, typically an oriental one





    cdl
  • (Commercial Driver's License) License which authorizes an individual to operate commercial motor vehicles and buses over 26,000 pounds gross vehicle weight.

  • Commercial Drivers License — required if the employee operates a vehicle that weights more than 26,000 pounds, hauls hazardous materials, or is designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.

  • A deferred-payment bank loan, like a student loan, but aimed at those who aren't entitled to one, whose employers aren't already footing the bill and who can't afford to pay the fees themselves.











cdl carpet - CDL: Commercial




CDL: Commercial Driver's License Test Prep


CDL: Commercial Driver's License Test Prep



From general knowledge and special endorsements to driving skills tests, Commercial Driver's License (CDL) Exam from LearningExpress offers you the comprehensive preparation you need to earn your commercial driver's license and start a lucrative career! Only one thing stands between you and a fulfilling career operating a commercial motor vehicle-passing the federally mandated commercial driver's license (CDL) test. From buses to trucks to trailers, Commercial Driver's License (CDL) Exam covers everything you need to know to ace the exam and get started making your living as a transportation professional. With helpful diagrams and illustrations throughout, Commercial Driver's License (CDL) Exam thoroughly prepares you for tests in all 50 states, with wide-ranging general information on safety, vehicle inspections, and transporting cargo plus in-depth information to help you qualify for special endorsements, including: Passenger transport Air brakes Combination vehicles Transporting hazardous materials Tankers Doubles/Triples In addition to help build a strong foundation in the subjects covered on the tests, Commercial Driver's License (CDL) Exam provides you with: Two practice exams with detailed answers, plus additional tests to practice for specific licensing endorsements Tried-and-true test-taking tips from the experts Up-to-date information on the Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety Act, Rules and Licensing and new national standards for driver training An appendix with additional resources and useful glossary of key terms With Commercial Driver's License (CDL) Exam, you'll be right on course down the road to success!










77% (16)





Millennium UN Plaza Hotel New York




Millennium UN Plaza Hotel New York





Millennium UN Plaza Hotel New York
One United Nations Plaza
44th Street between First and Second Avenue
New York, NY, 10017

The closest - One UN Plaza has 247 rooms located on floors 27-39. Three blocks away on the right is The Trump World Tower.
-----
The hotel rooms are in the upper portions of two buildings - the nearest is Two United Nations Plaza and the furthest is One United Nations Plaza.
----------
In the 1960s the U.N. had grown from 51 missions to over 120 missions without any parallel office and hotel room capacity being built in its neighborhood. According to the NY Times the city of New York was receiving complaints from the United Nations about the shortage of office space and hotel accommodations on the mideast side and it was having thoughts about leaving the city.

The city took action. In 1968 a joint agency was formed by the city, state and U.N. to develop a large scale extension of facilities across First Avenue from the U.N. The agency, the United Nations Development Corporation, acquired the land on the north side of 44th Street at 1st Avenue, essentially across the street from the U.N. headquarters.

The United Nations Development Corporation contracted with the architecture firm Roche-Dinkeloo. Kevin Roche acted as the principal designer for the firm while John Dinkeloo provided expertise in construction and technology. In the 60s and 70s they created stimulating examples of civic and corporate architecture. Later in the early 1990's they designed the 56-story Morgan Bank in the financial district.

The plan emerged for a four building complex of 40-story towers. The first building -- a combined office, apartment and hotel tower was completed in 1976.

The height of the tower was curtailed to 39-stories as it could not exceed height of the Secretariat Building of the U.N. Contradictorily - in 2000 Donald Trump built The Trump World Tower at United Nations Plaza three blocks to the north and was allowed to go 72 floors.

Known as One UN Plaza, it was completed with office space to the 26th floor and 247 hotel rooms on floors 27-39. On the 27th floor a health club with its glass-walled swimming pool was built. On the 39th floor is the only hotel tennis court available in Manhattan.

The 2nd phase known as Two UN Plaza was a mixed use office and hotel building. It was completed in 1983. It contained another 180 hotel rooms.

The exterior of the two buildings is uncompromisingly uniform in composition, being made of rectangular green-tinted glass plates tied together with narrow aluminum bands. The facade grid consists of floor-high elements of mirror windows -- the first used in NYC -- with four windows forming one element.

When the hotel opened in 1977 it was known as the United Nations Plaza Hotel - and in small print - (a United Nations Development Corporation project, managed by Hyatt International Corporation)

In the 1980s Hyatt added the hotel to its new Park Hyatt brand and altered the hotel's name to U.N. Plaza Hotel-Park Hyatt – New York, NY. Rakesh Sarna, the Chief Operating Officer for Hyatt International Operations, served as the hotel's general manager in the early 80's.

In 1997 the NY Times reported that Mayor Rudy Giuliani determined it was time for the city to sell off assets -particulary those that put the city in the role of landlord. He felt the city should not be in the hotel business and thought there was a growing demand by investors for New York City hotels. J.P. Morgan, the city's financial advisor, circulated the prospectus spelling out the terms of the hotel sale to large international hotel concerns, including Hyatt International which held the management contract to operate the hotel. The hotel portions of the two buildings had a complex ownership structure involving the city and the United Nations Development Corporation which complicated the sale.

The hotel quickly sold in 1997 ending the city's 21 year tenure in the hotel business. It was thought the city made out like a bandit receiving $102 million from Hong Kong-based Regal Hotels International. The $238,000 price per key for each of the 428 rooms was much more then earlier city estimates of a price range of $40 million to $85 million. The hotel was rebranded to the Regal UN Plaza.

During the preceding 10 years New York City's share of the hotel's profits, rent payments and property taxes averaged $2.48 million. By shifting the United Nations Plaza Hotel's ownership from public to private hands the city expected to receive annual city taxes of $6 million, which could increase to $9 million by the year 2010.

On July 28, 1997 Mayor Rudolph Giuliani "handed-over" the city-owned 427-room U.N. Plaza Hotel to Hong Kong-based Regal Hotels International - the final step of the $102 million purchase. The mayor was joined at the ceremony by Daniel Bong, Deputy Chairman of Regal Hotels International Holdings LTD, Douglas Pasquale, President and CEO of Regal Hotels and the hotel's General Manage











Millennium UN Plaza Hotel New York




Millennium UN Plaza Hotel New York





Millennium UN Plaza Hotel New York
One United Nations Plaza
44th Street between First and Second Avenue
New York, NY, 10017

Immediately across the street from the hotel is the United Nations Secretariat Building - seen here under renovation. It has 39 stories and was completed in 1952.
--------------
The hotel rooms are in the upper portions of two buildings - the nearest is Two United Nations Plaza and the furthest is One United Nations Plaza.
----------
In the 1960s the U.N. had grown from 51 missions to over 120 missions without any parallel office and hotel room capacity being built in its neighborhood. According to the NY Times the city of New York was receiving complaints from the United Nations about the shortage of office space and hotel accommodations on the mideast side and it was having thoughts about leaving the city.

The city took action. In 1968 a joint agency was formed by the city, state and U.N. to develop a large scale extension of facilities across First Avenue from the U.N. The agency, the United Nations Development Corporation, acquired the land on the north side of 44th Street at 1st Avenue, essentially across the street from the U.N. headquarters.

The United Nations Development Corporation contracted with the architecture firm Roche-Dinkeloo. Kevin Roche acted as the principal designer for the firm while John Dinkeloo provided expertise in construction and technology. In the 60s and 70s they created stimulating examples of civic and corporate architecture. Later in the early 1990's they designed the 56-story Morgan Bank in the financial district.

The plan emerged for a four building complex of 40-story towers. The first building -- a combined office, apartment and hotel tower was completed in 1976.

The height of the tower was curtailed to 39-stories as it could not exceed height of the Secretariat Building of the U.N. Contradictorily - in 2000 Donald Trump built The Trump World Tower at United Nations Plaza three blocks to the north and was allowed to go 72 floors.

Known as One UN Plaza, it was completed with office space to the 26th floor and 247 hotel rooms on floors 27-39. On the 27th floor a health club with its glass-walled swimming pool was built. On the 39th floor is the only hotel tennis court available in Manhattan.

The 2nd phase known as Two UN Plaza was a mixed use office and hotel building. It was completed in 1983. It contained another 180 hotel rooms.

The exterior of the two buildings is uncompromisingly uniform in composition, being made of rectangular green-tinted glass plates tied together with narrow aluminum bands. The facade grid consists of floor-high elements of mirror windows -- the first used in NYC -- with four windows forming one element.

When the hotel opened in 1977 it was known as the United Nations Plaza Hotel - and in small print - (a United Nations Development Corporation project, managed by Hyatt International Corporation)

In the 1980s Hyatt added the hotel to its new Park Hyatt brand and altered the hotel's name to U.N. Plaza Hotel-Park Hyatt – New York, NY. Rakesh Sarna, the Chief Operating Officer for Hyatt International Operations, served as the hotel's general manager in the early 80's.

In 1997 the NY Times reported that Mayor Rudy Giuliani determined it was time for the city to sell off assets -particulary those that put the city in the role of landlord. He felt the city should not be in the hotel business and thought there was a growing demand by investors for New York City hotels. J.P. Morgan, the city's financial advisor, circulated the prospectus spelling out the terms of the hotel sale to large international hotel concerns, including Hyatt International which held the management contract to operate the hotel. The hotel portions of the two buildings had a complex ownership structure involving the city and the United Nations Development Corporation which complicated the sale.

The hotel quickly sold in 1997 ending the city's 21 year tenure in the hotel business. It was thought the city made out like a bandit receiving $102 million from Hong Kong-based Regal Hotels International. The $238,000 price per key for each of the 428 rooms was much more then earlier city estimates of a price range of $40 million to $85 million. The hotel was rebranded to the Regal UN Plaza.

During the preceding 10 years New York City's share of the hotel's profits, rent payments and property taxes averaged $2.48 million. By shifting the United Nations Plaza Hotel's ownership from public to private hands the city expected to receive annual city taxes of $6 million, which could increase to $9 million by the year 2010.

On July 28, 1997 Mayor Rudolph Giuliani "handed-over" the city-owned 427-room U.N. Plaza Hotel to Hong Kong-based Regal Hotels International - the final step of the $102 million purchase. The mayor was joined at the ceremony by Daniel Bong, Deputy Chairman of Regal Hotels International Holdings LTD, Douglas Pasquale, President and C









cdl carpet








cdl carpet




Barron's CDL Truck Driver's Test






This updated manual prepares professional and prospective tractor-trailer drivers for the test that applicants must pass in order to receive a Commercial Driver's License. The test, administered by the U.S. Department of Transportation, is required in all 50 states. Comprehensive coverage of both the written and driving tests is presented with specific answers and explanations for all questions and situations. This book is profusely illustrated with detailed diagrams and line art that demonstrate the proper procedures drivers need to master for their behind-the-wheel tests.










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10 23

CLASSIC CARPET CLEANING. CLASSIC CARPET


CLASSIC CARPET CLEANING. CANADA RUG



Classic Carpet Cleaning





classic carpet cleaning






    carpet cleaning
  • Carpet cleaning, for beautification, and the removal of stains, dirt, grit, sand, and allergens can be achieved by several methods, both traditional and modern.

  • (carpet cleaner) foam or liquid soap used on rugs and carpets





    classic
  • (of a garment or design) Of a simple elegant style not greatly subject to changes in fashion

  • Remarkably and instructively typical

  • authoritative: of recognized authority or excellence; "the definitive work on Greece"; "classical methods of navigation"

  • Judged over a period of time to be of the highest quality and outstanding of its kind

  • a creation of the highest excellence

  • an artist who has created classic works











classic carpet cleaning - New Dirt




New Dirt Devil Classic Hand Vacuum Powerful Motorized Brush Easy-To-Empty Bagless Dirt Cup


New Dirt Devil Classic Hand Vacuum Powerful Motorized Brush Easy-To-Empty Bagless Dirt Cup



Classic Dirt Devil Hand Vacuum. Since the introduction of the original Hand Vac in 1984, Dirt Devil has sold more than 25 million hand vacs. Building on our heritage as a leader, Dirt Devil is proud to introduce the new Classic hand Vac. It has all the convenience of the original--now with twice the power. Powerful Motorized Brush - removes embedded dirt and stubborn pet hair better than suction alone; Easy-To-Empty Bagless Dirt Cup - keeps your hands away from the dirt; HEPA Filter - traps nearly 100 percent of common allergens and dust; 5-Piece Tool Set.










76% (11)





Chevy Bel Air




Chevy Bel Air





1955 Chevrolet Bel Air in Rockport MA. Taken during the Boston MA Monthly Meetup. Canon 7N, 50mm f2.0 1/250 on Ilford Delta 100 Pro developed in Kodak D-76. Spotted for dust, corrected levels, and slight sharpening in PS.

And more from Wiki:
In 1955, Chevrolets gained a V8 engine option. The new 265 cubic-inch V8 featured a modern, overhead valve high-compression, short stroke design that was so good that it remained in production in various forms, for many decades. The base V8 had a two-barrel carburetor and was rated at 162 horsepower (121 kW), and the "Power Pack" option featured a four-barrel carburetor and other upgrades, yielding 180 brake horsepower (130 kW). Later in the year, a "Super Power Pack" option added high-compression and a further 15 brake horsepower (11 kW). That year, Chevrolet's full-size model received new styling that earned it the "Hot One" designation by enthusiasts. Unlike Ford and Plymouth, Chevrolet's styling was considered crisp and clean. Bel Airs came with features found on cars in the lower models ranges plus interior carpet, chrome headliner bands on hardtops, chrome spears on front fenders, chrome window moldings, and full wheel covers. Models were further distinguished by the Bel Air name script in gold lettering. 1956 saw the introduction of the pillarless four-door model, called Sport Sedan and available in both Bel Air and Two-Ten models. Engine displacement grew to 283 cubic inches (4,638 cc) in 1957, with the "Super Turbo Fire V8" option producing 283 horsepower (211 kW) with the help of continuous fuel injection. These so-called "fuelie" cars are quite rare, since most Bel Airs were fitted with carburetion.

The 1955-1957 Bel Air is among the most recognizable American cars of all time; well-maintained examples (especially Sport Coupes and Convertibles) are highly sought after by collectors and enthusiasts. They are roomy, fuel-efficient, with tastefully restrained, period use tail fins and chrome. From 1955–57, production of the two-door Nomad station wagon was assigned to the Bel Air series, although its body and trim were unique to that model. Prior to becoming a regular production model, the Nomad first appeared as a Corvette-based concept vehicle in 1954. Chevrolet has since unveiled two concept cars bearing the Nomad name, most recently in 1999. The 1955-1957 Chevrolets are commonly referred to as TriFives.











Now - Rear seats




Now - Rear seats





The parts car's carpet was like new after the clean, and so were these seats. They're soft, and rather comfortable, even with the 900's limited rear legroom. The factory power window switches are illuminated, and there is no nasty plastic cover over the hole where the window winder was (this car had aftermarket power windows fitted by the dealer).

The parcel shelf was changed for the grey one along with the rest of the interior.

It's come up quite a treat, don't you think? Much classier than blue.









classic carpet cleaning







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10 23

CLEANING CARPETS HOME - CLEANING CARPETS


CLEANING CARPETS HOME - DONATE CARPET - VINEGAR CARPET



Cleaning Carpets Home





cleaning carpets home






    cleaning
  • Make (something or someone) free of dirt, marks, or mess, esp. by washing, wiping, or brushing

  • (clean) free from dirt or impurities; or having clean habits; "children with clean shining faces"; "clean white shirts"; "clean dishes"; "a spotlessly clean house"; "cats are clean animals"

  • make clean by removing dirt, filth, or unwanted substances from; "Clean the stove!"; "The dentist cleaned my teeth"

  • Remove the innards of (fish or poultry) prior to cooking

  • the act of making something clean; "he gave his shoes a good cleaning"





    carpets
  • A large rug, typically an oriental one

  • (carpet) cover completely, as if with a carpet; "flowers carpeted the meadows"

  • form a carpet-like cover (over)

  • (carpeting) rug: floor covering consisting of a piece of thick heavy fabric (usually with nap or pile)

  • A floor or stair covering made from thick woven fabric, typically shaped to fit a particular room

  • A thick or soft expanse or layer of something





    home
  • Relating to one's own country and its domestic affairs

  • Made, done, or intended for use in the place where one lives

  • at or to or in the direction of one's home or family; "He stays home on weekends"; "after the game the children brought friends home for supper"; "I'll be home tomorrow"; "came riding home in style"; "I hope you will come home for Christmas"; "I'll take her home"; "don't forget to write home"

  • Of or relating to the place where one lives

  • home(a): used of your own ground; "a home game"

  • provide with, or send to, a home











188/365 clean carpets




188/365 clean carpets





Traditional summer activity - washing carpets outside. I got introduced to this tradition at my grandparents' summer cottage when I was just a child. It used to be done in the sea or in a lake until, of course, it was discovered that the detergents used, even if the nature-friendly kind, contributed to the euthofication of the waterways. These days, towns provide inland washing facilities, which are quite nice communal centres in summer. Unfortunately, not many people do this themselves anymore in their busy lives, but rely on the services of chemical laundries.

I do hope rain will keep off for the next few days, so our carpets will get dry! Nothing beats the fresh smell of pine soap that the clean carpets spread around the home.











Cleaning the carpets




Cleaning the carpets





This afternoon I spent 3 hours cleaning all the downstairs carpets. We've got visitors this week-end and the carpets were so bad they had to be cleaned. The dogs, and especially Max, make them filthy. I don't know what I'd do without my Vax carpet cleaner - have to live with filthy carpets I suppose!
26 May 2010









cleaning carpets home







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10 23

DOMINION RUG : RUG


Dominion rug : About carpets.



Dominion Rug





dominion rug






    dominion
  • Sovereignty; control

  • dominance or power through legal authority; "France held undisputed dominion over vast areas of Africa"; "the rule of Caesar"

  • The territory of a sovereign or government

  • Each of the self-governing territories of the British Commonwealth

  • district: a region marked off for administrative or other purposes

  • one of the self-governing nations in the British Commonwealth





    rug
  • floor covering consisting of a piece of thick heavy fabric (usually with nap or pile)

  • A small carpet woven in a pattern of colors, typically by hand in a traditional style

  • Rhug (normally Y Rug in Welsh; sometimes given the antiquarian spelling Rug) is a township in the parish of Corwen, Denbighshire, Wales, formerly in the old cantref of Edeirnion and later a part of Merionethshire, two miles from CorwenRug Chapel and ten miles north east of Bala.

  • A rug (UK), blanket(Equine and other livestock, US), or coat (canine and other companion animals, US) is a covering or garment made by humans to protect their pets from the elements, as in a horse rug or dog coat.

  • A floor covering of shaggy or woven material, typically not extending over the entire floor

  • A thick woolen coverlet or wrap, used esp. when traveling











Sunday Morning




Sunday Morning





I

Complacencies of the peignoir, and late
Coffee and oranges in a sunny chair,
And the green freedom of a cockatoo
Upon a rug mingle to dissipate
The holy hush of ancient sacrifice.
She dreams a little, and she feels the dark
Encroachment of that old catastrophe,
As a calm darkens among water-lights.
The pungent oranges and bright, green wings
Seem things in some procession of the dead,
Winding across wide water, without sound.
The day is like wide water, without sound,
Stilled for the passing of her dreaming feet
Over the seas, to silent Palestine,
Dominion of the blood and sepulchre.

II

Why should she give her bounty to the dead?
What is divinity if it can come
Only in silent shadows and in dreams?
Shall she not find in comforts of the sun,
In pungent fruit and bright, green wings, or else
In any balm or beauty of the earth,
Things to be cherished like the thought of heaven?
Divinity must live within herself:
Passions of rain, or moods in falling snow;
Grievings in loneliness, or unsubdued
Elations when the forest blooms; gusty
Emotions on wet roads on autumn nights;
All pleasures and all pains, remembering
The bough of summer and the winter branch.
These are the measures destined for her soul.

III

Jove in the clouds had his inhuman birth.
No mother suckled him, no sweet land gave
Large-mannered motions to his mythy mind.
He moved among us, as a muttering king,
Magnificent, would move among his hinds,
Until our blood, commingling, virginal,
With heaven, brought such requital to desire
The very hinds discerned it, in a star.
Shall our blood fail? Or shall it come to be
The blood of paradise? And shall the earth
Seem all of paradise that we shall know?
The sky will be much friendlier then than now,
A part of labor and a part of pain,
And next in glory to enduring love,
Not this dividing and indifferent blue.

IV

She says, “I am content when wakened birds,
Before they fly, test the reality
Of misty fields, by their sweet questionings;
But when the birds are gone, and their warm fields
Return no more, where, then, is paradise?”
There is not any haunt of prophesy,
Nor any old chimera of the grave,
Neither the golden underground, nor isle
Melodious, where spirits gat them home,
Nor visionary south, nor cloudy palm
Remote on heaven’s hill, that has endured
As April’s green endures; or will endure
Like her remembrance of awakened birds,
Or her desire for June and evening, tipped
By the consummation of the swallow’s wings.

V

She says, “But in contentment I still feel
The need of some imperishable bliss.”
Death is the mother of beauty; hence from her,
Alone, shall come fulfilment to our dreams
And our desires. Although she strews the leaves
Of sure obliteration on our paths,
The path sick sorrow took, the many paths
Where triumph rang its brassy phrase, or love
Whispered a little out of tenderness,
She makes the willow shiver in the sun
For maidens who were wont to sit and gaze
Upon the grass, relinquished to their feet.
She causes boys to pile new plums and pears
On disregarded plate. The maidens taste
And stray impassioned in the littering leaves.

VI

Is there no change of death in paradise?
Does ripe fruit never fall? Or do the boughs
Hang always heavy in that perfect sky,
Unchanging, yet so like our perishing earth,
With rivers like our own that seek for seas
They never find, the same receding shores
That never touch with inarticulate pang?
Why set the pear upon those river banks
Or spice the shores with odors of the plum?
Alas, that they should wear our colors there,
The silken weavings of our afternoons,
And pick the strings of our insipid lutes!
Death is the mother of beauty, mystical,
Within whose burning bosom we devise
Our earthly mothers waiting, sleeplessly.

VII

Supple and turbulent, a ring of men
Shall chant in orgy on a summer morn
Their boisterous devotion to the sun,
Not as a god, but as a god might be,
Naked among them, like a savage source.
Their chant shall be a chant of paradise,
Out of their blood, returning to the sky;
And in their chant shall enter, voice by voice,
The windy lake wherein their lord delights,
The trees, like serafin, and echoing hills,
That choir among themselves long afterward.
They shall know well the heavenly fellowship
Of men that perish and of summer morn.
And whence they came and whither they shall go
The dew upon their feet shall manifest.

VIII

She hears, upon that water without sound,
A voice that cries, “The tomb in Palestine
Is not the porch of spirits lingering.
It is the grave of Jesus, where he lay.”
We live in an old chaos of the sun,
Or old dependency of day and night,
Or island solitude, unsponsored, free,
Of that wide water, inescapable.
Deer walk upon our mountains, and the quail
Whistle about us their spontaneous cries;
Sweet berries ripen in the wilderness;
And, in the isolation of the sky,
At evening, casual flocks of pigeons make
Ambiguous undulations as they sink,
Downward to darkness, on extended wings.


— Wallace Stevens

see











Sunday Morning




Sunday Morning





I

Complacencies of the peignoir, and late
Coffee and oranges in a sunny chair,
And the green freedom of a cockatoo
Upon a rug mingle to dissipate
The holy hush of ancient sacrifice.
She dreams a little, and she feels the dark
Encroachment of that old catastrophe,
As a calm darkens among water-lights.
The pungent oranges and bright, green wings
Seem things in some procession of the dead,
Winding across wide water, without sound.
The day is like wide water, without sound,
Stilled for the passing of her dreaming feet
Over the seas, to silent Palestine,
Dominion of the blood and sepulchre.


II

Why should she give her bounty to the dead?
What is divinity if it can come
Only in silent shadows and in dreams?
Shall she not find in comforts of the sun,
In pungent fruit and bright, green wings, or else
In any balm or beauty of the earth,
Things to be cherished like the thought of heaven?
Divinity must live within herself:
Passions of rain, or moods in falling snow;
Grievings in loneliness, or unsubdued
Elations when the forest blooms; gusty
Emotions on wet roads on autumn nights;
All pleasures and all pains, remembering
The bough of summer and the winter branch.
These are the measures destined for her soul.


III

Jove in the clouds had his inhuman birth.
No mother suckled him, no sweet land gave
Large-mannered motions to his mythy mind.
He moved among us, as a muttering king,
Magnificent, would move among his hinds,
Until our blood, commingling, virginal,
With heaven, brought such requital to desire
The very hinds discerned it, in a star.
Shall our blood fail? Or shall it come to be
The blood of paradise? And shall the earth
Seem all of paradise that we shall know?
The sky will be much friendlier then than now,
A part of labor and a part of pain,
And next in glory to enduring love,
Not this dividing and indifferent blue.


IV

She says, “I am content when wakened birds,
Before they fly, test the reality
Of misty fields, by their sweet questionings;
But when the birds are gone, and their warm fields
Return no more, where, then, is paradise?”
There is not any haunt of prophesy,
Nor any old chimera of the grave,
Neither the golden underground, nor isle
Melodious, where spirits gat them home,
Nor visionary south, nor cloudy palm
Remote on heaven’s hill, that has endured
As April’s green endures; or will endure
Like her remembrance of awakened birds,
Or her desire for June and evening, tipped
By the consummation of the swallow’s wings.


V

She says, “But in contentment I still feel
The need of some imperishable bliss.”
Death is the mother of beauty; hence from her,
Alone, shall come fulfilment to our dreams
And our desires. Although she strews the leaves
Of sure obliteration on our paths,
The path sick sorrow took, the many paths
Where triumph rang its brassy phrase, or love
Whispered a little out of tenderness,
She makes the willow shiver in the sun
For maidens who were wont to sit and gaze
Upon the grass, relinquished to their feet.
She causes boys to pile new plums and pears
On disregarded plate. The maidens taste
And stray impassioned in the littering leaves.


VI

Is there no
change of death in paradise?
Does ripe fruit never fall? Or do the boughs
Hang always heavy in that perfect sky,
Unchanging, yet so like our perishing earth,
With rivers like our own that seek for seas
They never find, the same receding shores
That never touch with inarticulate pang?
Why set the pear upon those river banks
Or spice the shores with odors of the plum?
Alas, that they should wear our colors there,
The silken weavings of our afternoons,
And pick the strings of our insipid lutes!
Death is the mother of beauty, mystical,
Within whose burning bosom we devise
Our earthly mothers waiting, sleeplessly.


VII

Supple and turbulent, a ring of men
Shall chant in orgy on a summer morn
Their boisterous devotion to the sun,
Not as a god, but as a god might be,
Naked among them, like a savage source.
Their chant shall be a chant of paradise,
Out of their blood, returning to the sky;
And in their chant shall enter, voice by voice,
The windy lake wherein their lord delights,
The trees, like serafin, and echoing hills,
That choir among themselves long afterward.
They shall know well the heavenly fellowship
Of men that perish and of summer morn.
And whence they came and whither they shall go
The dew upon their feet shall manifest.


VIII

She hears, upon that water without sound,
A voice that cries, “The tomb in Palestine
Is not the porch of spirits lingering.
It is the grave of Jesus, where he lay.”
We live in an old chaos of the sun,
Or old dependency of day and night,
Or island solitude, unsponsored, free,
Of that wide water, inescapable.
Deer walk upon our mountains, and the quail
Whistle about us their spontaneous cries;
Sweet berries ripen in the wilderness;
And, in the isolation of the sky,
At evening, casual flocks of pigeons make
Ambiguous undulations as they sink,
Downward to darknes









dominion rug







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10 23

INSTALL CARPET SQUARES : CARPET SQUARES


Install Carpet Squares : Brooklyn Rug Cleaning



Install Carpet Squares





install carpet squares







    install
  • Place (someone) in a new position of authority, esp. with ceremony

  • set up for use; "install the washer and dryer"; "We put in a new sink"

  • place; "Her manager had set her up at the Ritz"

  • Place or fix (equipment or machinery) in position ready for use

  • Establish (someone) in a new place, condition, or role

  • put into an office or a position; "the new president was installed immediately after the election"











install carpet squares - Milliken Legato




Milliken Legato Fuse 'Texture Casual Cream' Carpet Tiles


Milliken Legato Fuse 'Texture Casual Cream' Carpet Tiles



The Legato carpet tiles are approximately 20" x 20" square and can be used to create a vast array of custom layouts and designs within your living space. The product installs easily and there is NO ADHESIVE NEEDED, thanks to Milliken's patented TractionBack? adhesive system that is pre-applied to tile. Fuse is made of 100% Milliken-Certified Wear-On? Type 6,6 Nylon and includes built-in soil and stain protection. Spills and stains are easily repaired by simply replacing the damaged tile. Mix and match, No mess, Area Rug or Wall-to-wall, Unlimited design opportunities- all at your fingertips with Legato Fuse Carpet tiles. The ultimate DIY product.










85% (10)





Tehran Skyline




Tehran Skyline





Tehran at sunrise, featuring the Miladi Tower. Tehran (IPA: [t?eh???n]; Persian: ????? Tehran) is the capital and largest city of Iran (khersia), and the administrative center of Tehran Province. Excavations place the existence of settlements in Tehran as far back as 6000 BCE.[citation needed] Tehran was well known as a village in the 9th century, but was less well-known than the city of Rhages which was flourishing nearby in the early era. In the 13th century, following the destruction of Ray by Mongols, many of its inhabitants escaped to Tehran. In some sources of the early era, the city is mentioned as "Rhages's Tehran" . The city is later mentioned in Hamdollah Mostowfi's Nuz'hat al-Qulub (written in 1340) as a famous village.

Don Ruy Gonzales de Clavijo, a Castilian ambassador, was probably the first European to visit Tehran, stopping in July 1404, while on a journey to Samarkand (now in Uzbekistan) and the Mongol capital at the time. At this time, the city of Tehran was unwalled.

Tehran became a residence of the Safavid rulers in the 17th century. Tahmasp I built a bazaar and a wall around the city, but it somewhat fell out of favor after Abbas I turned sick when he was passing the city to go to a war with the Uzbeks.

In the early of 18th century, Karim Khan Zand ordered a palace, a harem[citation needed], and a government office to be built in Tehran, possibly to declare the city his capital, but later moved his government to Shiraz. Tehran finally became the capital of Persia in 1795, when the Qajar king Agha Mohammad Khan was crowned in the city. It remains the capital to this day.

During World War II, British and Soviet troops entered the city. Tehran was the site of the Tehran Conference in 1943, attended by U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, and Soviet Premier Joseph Stalin.

Following the war, the city's older landmarks suffered under the rule of Mohammad Reza Shah. The Shah believed that ancient buildings such as large parts of the Golestan Palace, Takieh-ye Dowlat, the Toopkhaneh Square (pictured to the right), the magnificent city fortifications and the old citadel among others should not be part of a modern city. They were systematically destroyed and modern 1950s and 1960s buildings were built in their place. Tehran bazar was divided in half and many historic buildings were destroyed in order to build wide straight avenues in the capital. Many excellent examples of Persian Gardens also became targets to new construction projects. The decision to carry these out is presently largely seen as a foolish mistake that hurt the visual fabric and the cultural identity of the city beyond repair. Apartment blocks are introduced in this period.

On September 8, 1978, demonstrations against the Shah led to riots. The army reportedly opened fire on the demonstrating mob. Martial law was installed in the wake of the ensuing revolution, from 1978–79.

During the 1980–88 Iran-Iraq War, Tehran was the scene of repeated Scud missile attacks and air strikes against random residential and industrial targets within the city, resulting in thousands of civilian casualties. Material damage was repaired soon after each strike. Tehran attracts war refugees in millions.

After the war, cheap Soviet-style apartments multiplied throughout the city without any plan. At present, little is left of Tehran's old quarters. Instead, modern high-rise buildings dominate the city's skyline and new modern apartments have and are replacing the few remaining old houses at a rapid pace. Tehran-style home architecture has almost vanished completely. This is often referred to as "Tehran identity Disaster".[citation needed]

Tehran is also home to many grand Mansions in the North of the city and the "Shahrak e Gharb" District.











Tehran by Seurat




Tehran by Seurat





Excavations place the existence of settlements in Tehran as far back as 6000 BCE.[citation needed] Tehran was well known as a village in the 9th century, but was less well-known than the city of Rhages which was flourishing nearby in the early era. In the 13th century, following the destruction of Ray by Mongols, many of its inhabitants escaped to Tehran. In some sources of the early era, the city is mentioned as "Rhages's Tehran" . The city is later mentioned in Hamdollah Mostowfi's Nuz'hat al-Qulub (written in 1340) as a famous village.

Don Ruy Gonzales de Clavijo, a Castilian ambassador, was probably the first European to visit Tehran, stopping in July 1404, while on a journey to Samarkand (now in Uzbekistan) and the Mongol capital at the time. At this time, the city of Tehran was unwalled.

Tehran became a residence of the Safavid rulers in the 17th century. Tahmasp I built a bazaar and a wall around the city, but it somewhat fell out of favor after Abbas I turned sick when he was passing the city to go to a war with the Uzbeks.

In the early of 18th century, Karim Khan Zand ordered a palace, a harem[citation needed], and a government office to be built in Tehran, possibly to declare the city his capital, but later moved his government to Shiraz. Tehran finally became the capital of Persia in 1795, when the Qajar king Agha Mohammad Khan was crowned in the city. It remains the capital to this day.

During World War II, British and Soviet troops entered the city. Tehran was the site of the Tehran Conference in 1943, attended by U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, and Soviet Premier Joseph Stalin.

Following the war, the city's older landmarks suffered under the rule of Mohammad Reza Shah. The Shah believed that ancient buildings such as large parts of the Golestan Palace, Takieh-ye Dowlat, the Toopkhaneh Square (pictured to the right), the magnificent city fortifications and the old citadel among others should not be part of a modern city. They were systematically destroyed and modern 1950s and 1960s buildings were built in their place. Tehran bazar was divided in half and many historic buildings were destroyed in order to build wide straight avenues in the capital. Many excellent examples of Persian Gardens also became targets to new construction projects. The decision to carry these out is presently largely seen as a foolish mistake that hurt the visual fabric and the cultural identity of the city beyond repair. Apartment blocks are introduced in this period.

On September 8, 1978, demonstrations against the Shah led to riots. The army reportedly opened fire on the demonstrating mob. Martial law was installed in the wake of the ensuing revolution, from 1978–79.

During the 1980–88 Iran-Iraq War, Tehran was the scene of repeated Scud missile attacks and air strikes against random residential and industrial targets within the city, resulting in thousands of civilian casualties. Material damage was repaired soon after each strike. Tehran attracts war refugees in millions.

After the war, cheap Soviet-style apartments multiplied throughout the city without any plan. At present, little is left of Tehran's old quarters. Instead, modern high-rise buildings dominate the city's skyline and new modern apartments have and are replacing the few remaining old houses at a rapid pace. Tehran-style home architecture has almost vanished completely. This is often referred to as "Tehran identity Disaster".[citation needed]

Tehran is also home to many grand Mansions in the North of the city and the "Shahrak e Gharb" District.









install carpet squares







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