10 23

INSTALL CARPET SQUARES : CARPET SQUARES


Install Carpet Squares : Brooklyn Rug Cleaning



Install Carpet Squares





install carpet squares







    install
  • Place (someone) in a new position of authority, esp. with ceremony

  • set up for use; "install the washer and dryer"; "We put in a new sink"

  • place; "Her manager had set her up at the Ritz"

  • Place or fix (equipment or machinery) in position ready for use

  • Establish (someone) in a new place, condition, or role

  • put into an office or a position; "the new president was installed immediately after the election"











install carpet squares - Milliken Legato




Milliken Legato Fuse 'Texture Casual Cream' Carpet Tiles


Milliken Legato Fuse 'Texture Casual Cream' Carpet Tiles



The Legato carpet tiles are approximately 20" x 20" square and can be used to create a vast array of custom layouts and designs within your living space. The product installs easily and there is NO ADHESIVE NEEDED, thanks to Milliken's patented TractionBack? adhesive system that is pre-applied to tile. Fuse is made of 100% Milliken-Certified Wear-On? Type 6,6 Nylon and includes built-in soil and stain protection. Spills and stains are easily repaired by simply replacing the damaged tile. Mix and match, No mess, Area Rug or Wall-to-wall, Unlimited design opportunities- all at your fingertips with Legato Fuse Carpet tiles. The ultimate DIY product.










85% (10)





Tehran Skyline




Tehran Skyline





Tehran at sunrise, featuring the Miladi Tower. Tehran (IPA: [t?eh???n]; Persian: ????? Tehran) is the capital and largest city of Iran (khersia), and the administrative center of Tehran Province. Excavations place the existence of settlements in Tehran as far back as 6000 BCE.[citation needed] Tehran was well known as a village in the 9th century, but was less well-known than the city of Rhages which was flourishing nearby in the early era. In the 13th century, following the destruction of Ray by Mongols, many of its inhabitants escaped to Tehran. In some sources of the early era, the city is mentioned as "Rhages's Tehran" . The city is later mentioned in Hamdollah Mostowfi's Nuz'hat al-Qulub (written in 1340) as a famous village.

Don Ruy Gonzales de Clavijo, a Castilian ambassador, was probably the first European to visit Tehran, stopping in July 1404, while on a journey to Samarkand (now in Uzbekistan) and the Mongol capital at the time. At this time, the city of Tehran was unwalled.

Tehran became a residence of the Safavid rulers in the 17th century. Tahmasp I built a bazaar and a wall around the city, but it somewhat fell out of favor after Abbas I turned sick when he was passing the city to go to a war with the Uzbeks.

In the early of 18th century, Karim Khan Zand ordered a palace, a harem[citation needed], and a government office to be built in Tehran, possibly to declare the city his capital, but later moved his government to Shiraz. Tehran finally became the capital of Persia in 1795, when the Qajar king Agha Mohammad Khan was crowned in the city. It remains the capital to this day.

During World War II, British and Soviet troops entered the city. Tehran was the site of the Tehran Conference in 1943, attended by U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, and Soviet Premier Joseph Stalin.

Following the war, the city's older landmarks suffered under the rule of Mohammad Reza Shah. The Shah believed that ancient buildings such as large parts of the Golestan Palace, Takieh-ye Dowlat, the Toopkhaneh Square (pictured to the right), the magnificent city fortifications and the old citadel among others should not be part of a modern city. They were systematically destroyed and modern 1950s and 1960s buildings were built in their place. Tehran bazar was divided in half and many historic buildings were destroyed in order to build wide straight avenues in the capital. Many excellent examples of Persian Gardens also became targets to new construction projects. The decision to carry these out is presently largely seen as a foolish mistake that hurt the visual fabric and the cultural identity of the city beyond repair. Apartment blocks are introduced in this period.

On September 8, 1978, demonstrations against the Shah led to riots. The army reportedly opened fire on the demonstrating mob. Martial law was installed in the wake of the ensuing revolution, from 1978–79.

During the 1980–88 Iran-Iraq War, Tehran was the scene of repeated Scud missile attacks and air strikes against random residential and industrial targets within the city, resulting in thousands of civilian casualties. Material damage was repaired soon after each strike. Tehran attracts war refugees in millions.

After the war, cheap Soviet-style apartments multiplied throughout the city without any plan. At present, little is left of Tehran's old quarters. Instead, modern high-rise buildings dominate the city's skyline and new modern apartments have and are replacing the few remaining old houses at a rapid pace. Tehran-style home architecture has almost vanished completely. This is often referred to as "Tehran identity Disaster".[citation needed]

Tehran is also home to many grand Mansions in the North of the city and the "Shahrak e Gharb" District.











Tehran by Seurat




Tehran by Seurat





Excavations place the existence of settlements in Tehran as far back as 6000 BCE.[citation needed] Tehran was well known as a village in the 9th century, but was less well-known than the city of Rhages which was flourishing nearby in the early era. In the 13th century, following the destruction of Ray by Mongols, many of its inhabitants escaped to Tehran. In some sources of the early era, the city is mentioned as "Rhages's Tehran" . The city is later mentioned in Hamdollah Mostowfi's Nuz'hat al-Qulub (written in 1340) as a famous village.

Don Ruy Gonzales de Clavijo, a Castilian ambassador, was probably the first European to visit Tehran, stopping in July 1404, while on a journey to Samarkand (now in Uzbekistan) and the Mongol capital at the time. At this time, the city of Tehran was unwalled.

Tehran became a residence of the Safavid rulers in the 17th century. Tahmasp I built a bazaar and a wall around the city, but it somewhat fell out of favor after Abbas I turned sick when he was passing the city to go to a war with the Uzbeks.

In the early of 18th century, Karim Khan Zand ordered a palace, a harem[citation needed], and a government office to be built in Tehran, possibly to declare the city his capital, but later moved his government to Shiraz. Tehran finally became the capital of Persia in 1795, when the Qajar king Agha Mohammad Khan was crowned in the city. It remains the capital to this day.

During World War II, British and Soviet troops entered the city. Tehran was the site of the Tehran Conference in 1943, attended by U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, and Soviet Premier Joseph Stalin.

Following the war, the city's older landmarks suffered under the rule of Mohammad Reza Shah. The Shah believed that ancient buildings such as large parts of the Golestan Palace, Takieh-ye Dowlat, the Toopkhaneh Square (pictured to the right), the magnificent city fortifications and the old citadel among others should not be part of a modern city. They were systematically destroyed and modern 1950s and 1960s buildings were built in their place. Tehran bazar was divided in half and many historic buildings were destroyed in order to build wide straight avenues in the capital. Many excellent examples of Persian Gardens also became targets to new construction projects. The decision to carry these out is presently largely seen as a foolish mistake that hurt the visual fabric and the cultural identity of the city beyond repair. Apartment blocks are introduced in this period.

On September 8, 1978, demonstrations against the Shah led to riots. The army reportedly opened fire on the demonstrating mob. Martial law was installed in the wake of the ensuing revolution, from 1978–79.

During the 1980–88 Iran-Iraq War, Tehran was the scene of repeated Scud missile attacks and air strikes against random residential and industrial targets within the city, resulting in thousands of civilian casualties. Material damage was repaired soon after each strike. Tehran attracts war refugees in millions.

After the war, cheap Soviet-style apartments multiplied throughout the city without any plan. At present, little is left of Tehran's old quarters. Instead, modern high-rise buildings dominate the city's skyline and new modern apartments have and are replacing the few remaining old houses at a rapid pace. Tehran-style home architecture has almost vanished completely. This is often referred to as "Tehran identity Disaster".[citation needed]

Tehran is also home to many grand Mansions in the North of the city and the "Shahrak e Gharb" District.









install carpet squares







Similar posts:

carpet cleaning hayward

magic carpet ride artist

electric carpet sweepers

round rugs cheap

skyhawk rugs

current carpet trends

carpet cleaning in nashville

off white carpet

tartan rugs for sale



Comment
Trackback
Comment form
 Only the blog author may view the comment.

Author:acoustic carpet tiles
Welcome to FC2!

Profile
Latest comments
Latest trackbacks
Monthly archive

Page Top
Powered by FC2 Blog | | Template Design by スタンダード・デザインラボ