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CARPETS 2 U - 2 U


Carpets 2 u - Carpet cleaning phoenix az.



Carpets 2 U





carpets 2 u






    carpets
  • A floor or stair covering made from thick woven fabric, typically shaped to fit a particular room

  • (carpet) cover completely, as if with a carpet; "flowers carpeted the meadows"

  • (carpeting) rug: floor covering consisting of a piece of thick heavy fabric (usually with nap or pile)

  • A large rug, typically an oriental one

  • form a carpet-like cover (over)

  • A thick or soft expanse or layer of something





    2
  • two: the cardinal number that is the sum of one and one or a numeral representing this number

  • two: being one more than one; "he received two messages"

  • .2 Network (pronounced Dot-Two Network) is the name of an upcoming television network designed for digital television subchannels (hence the ".2") owned by Guardian Enterprise Group that will replace the GTN network on a date yet to be announced.











carpets 2 u - Green Card




Green Card via the Red Carpet: A Comprehensive Guide to Immigrating to the U.S. by Investing in an EB-5 Regional Center


Green Card via the Red Carpet: A Comprehensive Guide to Immigrating to the U.S. by Investing in an EB-5 Regional Center



In their thorough and practical Green Card Via the Red Carpet: A Comprehensive Guide to your US Immigration Options under the EB-5 Regional Center Investor Visa Program, financial and relocation specialists Stephen Parnell and Andrew Bartlett share vital information sought by foreign nationals about the fastest and safest way to live, work, or retire in the United States. Page after page, readers will learn so much more than the pros and cons of immigration. Included in this guide are descriptions of the many visa options--there are nearly two dozen non-immigrant visas alone!--and how to define the many categories. The EB-5 Regional Center Investor Visa Program is discussed in detail, along with all requirements, investment minimums, and qualifications for partnerships and joint ventures. What is a regional center and how does it benefit immigrants? How does one invest safely in a new country, secure that no fraud or underhandedness is involved? And how do newcomers establish credit and banking connections? Everything an immigrant needs to know...and much more...is found in this book. If there is one message that rings louder than all the others it is this: If you or someone you know are considering immigration to the United States, contact an impartial and expert advisor.










80% (8)





U.S. Africa Command C4ISR Senior Leaders Conference, Vicenza, Italy, February 2011




U.S. Africa Command C4ISR Senior Leaders Conference, Vicenza, Italy, February 2011





Col. Leon Rodance Ndinga of the Republic of Congo,

U.S. Army Africa photo by Sgt. 1st Class Kyle Davis

U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM) hosted its second annual C4ISR Senior Leaders Conference Feb. 2-4 at Caserma Ederle, headquarters of U.S. Army Africa, in Vicenza, Italy.

The communications and intelligence community event, hosted by Brig. Gen. Robert Ferrell, AFRICOM C4 director, drew approximately 80 senior leaders from diverse U.S. military and government branches and agencies, as well as representatives of African nations and the African Union.

“The conference is a combination of our U.S. AFRICOM C4 systems and intel directorate,” said Ferrell. “We come together annually to bring the team together to work on common goals to work on throughout the year. The team consists of our coalition partners as well as our inter-agency partners, as well as our components and U.S. AFRICOM staff.”

The conference focused on updates from participants, and on assessing the present state and goals of coalition partners in Africa, he said.

“The theme for our conference is ‘Delivering Capabilities to a Joint Information Environment,’ and we see it as a joint and combined team ... working together, side by side, to promote peace and stability there on the African continent,” Ferrell said.

Three goals of this year’s conference were to strengthen the team, assess priorities across the board, and get a better fix on the impact that the establishment of the U.S. Cyber Command will have on all members’ efforts in the future, he said.

“With the stand-up of U.S. Cyber Command, it brings a lot of unique challenges that we as a team need to talk through to ensure that our information is protected at all times,” Ferrell said.

African Union (AU) representatives from four broad geographic regions of Africa attended, which generated a holistic perspective on needs and requirements from across the continent, he said.

“We have members from the African Union headquarters that is located in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; we have members that are from Uganda; from Zambia; from Ghana; and also from the Congo. What are the gaps, what are the things that we kind of need to assist with as we move forward on our engagements on the African continent?” Ferrell said.

U.S. Army Africa Commander, Maj. Gen. David R. Hogg, welcomed participants as the conference got under way.

“We’re absolutely delighted to be the host for this conference, and we hope that this week you get a whole lot out of it,” said Hogg.

He took the opportunity to address the participants not only as their host, but from the perspective of a customer whose missions depend on the results of their efforts to support commanders in the field.

“When we’re talking about this group of folks that are here — from the joint side, from our African partners, from State, all those folks — it’s about partnership and interoperability. And every commander who’s ever had to fight in a combined environment understands that interoperability is the thing that absolutely slaps you upside the head,” Hogg said.

“We’re in the early stages of the process here of working with the African Union and the other partners, and you have an opportunity to design this from the end state, versus just building a bunch of ‘gunkulators.’ And so, the message is: think about what the end state is supposed to look like and construct the strategy to support the end state.

“Look at where we want to be at and design it that way,” Hogg said.

He also admonished participants to consider the second- and third-order effects of their choices in designing networks.

“With that said, over the next four days, I hope this conference works very well for you. If there’s anything we can do to make your stay better, please let us know,” Hogg said.

Over the following three days, participants engaged in a steady stream of briefings and presentations focused on systems, missions and updates from the field.

Col. Joseph W. Angyal, director of U.S. Army Africa G-6, gave an overview of operations and issues that focused on fundamentals, the emergence of regional accords as a way forward, and the evolution of a joint network enterprise that would serve all interested parties.

“What we’re trying to do is to work regionally. That’s frankly a challenge, but as we stand up the capability, really for the U.S. government, and work through that, we hope to become more regionally focused,” he said.

He referred to Africa Endeavor, an annual, multi-nation communications exercise, as a test bed for the current state of affairs on the continent, and an aid in itself to future development.

“In order to conduct those exercises, to conduct those security and cooperation events, and to meet contingency missions, we really, from the C4ISR perspective, have five big challenges,” Angyal said.

“You heard General Hogg this morning talk about ‘think about the customer’ — you’ve got to allow me to be able to get access to our data; I’ve got to be abl











U.S. Africa Command C4ISR Senior Leaders Conference, Vicenza, Italy, February 2011




U.S. Africa Command C4ISR Senior Leaders Conference, Vicenza, Italy, February 2011





Sgt. John Wanyama of AU Kenya.

U.S. Army Africa photo by Sgt. 1st Class Kyle Davis

U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM) hosted its second annual C4ISR Senior Leaders Conference Feb. 2-4 at Caserma Ederle, headquarters of U.S. Army Africa, in Vicenza, Italy.

The communications and intelligence community event, hosted by Brig. Gen. Robert Ferrell, AFRICOM C4 director, drew approximately 80 senior leaders from diverse U.S. military and government branches and agencies, as well as representatives of African nations and the African Union.

“The conference is a combination of our U.S. AFRICOM C4 systems and intel directorate,” said Ferrell. “We come together annually to bring the team together to work on common goals to work on throughout the year. The team consists of our coalition partners as well as our inter-agency partners, as well as our components and U.S. AFRICOM staff.”

The conference focused on updates from participants, and on assessing the present state and goals of coalition partners in Africa, he said.

“The theme for our conference is ‘Delivering Capabilities to a Joint Information Environment,’ and we see it as a joint and combined team ... working together, side by side, to promote peace and stability there on the African continent,” Ferrell said.

Three goals of this year’s conference were to strengthen the team, assess priorities across the board, and get a better fix on the impact that the establishment of the U.S. Cyber Command will have on all members’ efforts in the future, he said.

“With the stand-up of U.S. Cyber Command, it brings a lot of unique challenges that we as a team need to talk through to ensure that our information is protected at all times,” Ferrell said.

African Union (AU) representatives from four broad geographic regions of Africa attended, which generated a holistic perspective on needs and requirements from across the continent, he said.

“We have members from the African Union headquarters that is located in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; we have members that are from Uganda; from Zambia; from Ghana; and also from the Congo. What are the gaps, what are the things that we kind of need to assist with as we move forward on our engagements on the African continent?” Ferrell said.

U.S. Army Africa Commander, Maj. Gen. David R. Hogg, welcomed participants as the conference got under way.

“We’re absolutely delighted to be the host for this conference, and we hope that this week you get a whole lot out of it,” said Hogg.

He took the opportunity to address the participants not only as their host, but from the perspective of a customer whose missions depend on the results of their efforts to support commanders in the field.

“When we’re talking about this group of folks that are here — from the joint side, from our African partners, from State, all those folks — it’s about partnership and interoperability. And every commander who’s ever had to fight in a combined environment understands that interoperability is the thing that absolutely slaps you upside the head,” Hogg said.

“We’re in the early stages of the process here of working with the African Union and the other partners, and you have an opportunity to design this from the end state, versus just building a bunch of ‘gunkulators.’ And so, the message is: think about what the end state is supposed to look like and construct the strategy to support the end state.

“Look at where we want to be at and design it that way,” Hogg said.

He also admonished participants to consider the second- and third-order effects of their choices in designing networks.

“With that said, over the next four days, I hope this conference works very well for you. If there’s anything we can do to make your stay better, please let us know,” Hogg said.

Over the following three days, participants engaged in a steady stream of briefings and presentations focused on systems, missions and updates from the field.

Col. Joseph W. Angyal, director of U.S. Army Africa G-6, gave an overview of operations and issues that focused on fundamentals, the emergence of regional accords as a way forward, and the evolution of a joint network enterprise that would serve all interested parties.

“What we’re trying to do is to work regionally. That’s frankly a challenge, but as we stand up the capability, really for the U.S. government, and work through that, we hope to become more regionally focused,” he said.

He referred to Africa Endeavor, an annual, multi-nation communications exercise, as a test bed for the current state of affairs on the continent, and an aid in itself to future development.

“In order to conduct those exercises, to conduct those security and cooperation events, and to meet contingency missions, we really, from the C4ISR perspective, have five big challenges,” Angyal said.

“You heard General Hogg this morning talk about ‘think about the customer’ — you’ve got to allow me to be able to get access to our data; I’ve got to be able to get to the data









carpets 2 u








carpets 2 u




Louisiana Redeemed: The Overthrow of Carpet-Bag Rule 1876-1880






Much has been written on what happened in the several Southern states during the Reconstruction but very little has been done on the changes that took place after the Democrats ousted the Republicans from control. Reconstruction in Louisiana lasted longer than in any other state . . . Louisiana had suffered for fourteen years preceding 1876 when the courage and tact of Francis T. Nicholls drove the carpet-bag government from the state. . . . The change from Radical to Democratic rule constitutes an important period in the history of Louisiana. The events during this transition cast their influence far into the post-Reconstruction years. The political technique used was to be effective for some time. Likewise, the political controversies that arose between factions of the Democratic party have been revived frequently in campaigns until recently. -from the Preface










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